Route 1

2016

During photographer Ling Lin’s road trip across Iceland, the completely isolated landscape and its natural inhabitant triggered her contemplation of the relationship between humans and the land we were born in. This vast land that is both tenacious and fragile carries us and our civilization. Too often we became absorbed with our own being that we forgot about the world beyond us. Too often we are bounded by our own civilization and belongingness, until we are in absolute isolation to find freedom.

Interstellar

2016

Lin documented the almost alien like landscape during her road trip through Iceland. Awed by the breathtaking nature and moonlike landscape, she starts to question the existence of human civilization. The isolated yet boundless land brings overwhelming emotions that are difficult to process by oneself.

Green, Wood, Red Bricks

2015 - Present

Unable to travel as much as she would like to, Lin started exploring the country she has been living in for the past 11 years - The Netherlands. As large part of the land has been claimed from the sea, a huge part of the country is man-made. Consequently, The Netherlands is highly urbanized. Even though, there are plenty of plants and parks around the country. The series ‘Green, Wood, Red Bricks’ explores the Dutch landscapes and how nature and urban constructions are brought together.

Blue

2013 - Present

‘Blue’ is an ongoing series and personal project that documents photographer’s occasion escape from the city in search of tranquility. The location of each image is kept anonymous to the viewer, as the compilation of still images reflects photographer’s state of mind the moment she pressed the shutter. Lin keeps the personal story of each image to herself with an intention to encourage free interpretation of the viewers.

Silent Hill

2015

Photo series ‘Silent Hill’ captured the cloud filled mountains in Tibet. Underneath this tranquil landscape lies the clash of beliefs and political views. The two opposition claims regarding the sovereignty of Tibet are subject to debate. The photo series does not attempt to take any political stand, rather to call attention to the nature of conflicts in general. It asks the question of why we choose to believe what we believe. It questions the messages we receive and how they are filtered. The title ‘silent’ hill also has a double meaning of political practice that ‘silence’ unwanted messages.